10 May 2007

Super Thursday 2

Prompted by the anonymous comment about the latest 13% increase in the projected cost of ID cards, due to become compulsory for everyone applying for a new passport from 2009, I am opening this thread for any other readers who spot items of "bad news" being buried today.

I'll add to the list with this morning's government admission that 28 NHS trusts are failing to ensure non-emergency hospital patients are kept in single-sex accommodation — incidentally also yet another of Blair's broken promises, as he committed himself to end mixed-sex accommodation in the NHS in his original 1997 general election manifesto.

6 comments:

Disillusioned, London said...

What about the National Autistic Society report claiming that ethnic minority children with autism face a double discrimination in education and two-thirds of their parents have no choice over which school their children will attend.

Anonynurse said...

As the NHS Blog Doctor notes, research today shows that the UK has one of the worst records for access to new cancer drugs and five-year survival rates of just 53% for women and 43% for men, compared with 71% and 53% respectively over the Channel in France.

James said...

Interest rates up YET AGAIN must rank as the worst piece of news of the day - that's another 20 quid on my monthly mortgage repayments :-(

The Remittance Man said...

How about Charlie Falconer announcing on his first day as "Minister for Justice" that sentences were "too long".

The Last Boy Scout said...

Two civil servants working for the government being jailed for leaking confidential memos.

Indie Jones said...

Here's another: Ministers 'wasted' £20m on city academy consultants

"Teachers' leaders argued that the money - when coupled with the £28m spent taking on non-teaching project managers to plan the programme - could have been used to build two new schools. Alternatively, it could have been spent on paying the wages of 1,300 teachers for a year.

"The figures emerged from a Commons question placed by the Conservatives' education spokesman David Willetts. It showed that - on average - ministers had spent £500,000 on each of the 46 academies which have so far been set up - the equivalent of hiring at least a dozen teachers in each of the schools."